Archive for September 2013

National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day

September 19, 2013

Today is National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day (NHAAAD). This year’s theme for NHAAAD is Aging is a part of life: HIV doesn’t have to be.

Whether you are 50+ and living with HIV yourself, or you are taking care of someone older who does, NHAAAD provides an opportunity to bring attention to the complex issues of HIV and aging, and to take action.

Here are three ways you can recognize NHAAAD:

Know Your HIV Status

Share the Facts

Join the Conversation

Want to be a part of today’s dialog on HIV and aging? All you have to do is follow or tweet with the hashtag #NHAAAD Exit Disclaimer on Twitter, post a message on Facebook, or comment on this blog post or other AIDS.gov posts. We want to hear about your plans to observe NHAAAD!

Find out more at AIDS.gov.

Facebook chats help minority men get tested for HIV

September 5, 2013

From opb.org online…

It didn’t take long for people to figure out that Facebook could be a great place to connect with other people dealing with the same health problems. But public health officials have moved cautiously, lest their efforts backfire. Do you really want to “like” STDs?

But there is now evidence the social media approach can help, even when the health condition is sensitive. Facebook can play a role in persuading people at high risk of HIV/AIDS to use a home HIV test kit, a study finds.

To reach young gay Latino and African-American men, researchers at the David Geffen School of Medicine and School of Public health at the UCLA trained men in the same demographic as peer leaders, giving them information on how HIV spreads. That’s a time-honored public health technique. They also created a comparison group, with peer leaders trained to share general health information.

The peer leaders then tried to communicate on Facebook with men who had volunteered to participate in a study. Because there are no best practices for using social media to communicate health information, the peer leaders had to make it up as they went along. First, they tried a friendly message and then some social chat, with messages tailored to the participants’ interests. Then they invited participants to join either a closed Facebook group with information on HIV prevention, or if they were in the control group, on general health.

For their part, the participants, who were recruited through Facebook and community organizations, were told to use Facebook as they normally would. Most interacted with the peer leaders, a fact that the study authors say reflects the fact that African-Americans and Latinos are more likely to use social networking sites than the general population.

Read the full article here.