Archive for September 2016

September 27 is National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

September 21, 2016

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

September 27 is National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, a day of action to focus on what each of us can do to reduce the toll of HIV among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM).

ngmhaad_456pxAlthough only 2% of the US population, gay and bisexual men account for more than half of the 1.2 million people living with HIV in the United States and two-thirds of all new diagnoses each year. If trends continue, 1 in 6 gay and bisexual men will be diagnosed with HIV in their lifetime, including 1 in 2 black gay and bisexual men, 1 in 4 Latino gay and bisexual men, and 1 in 11 white gay and bixesual men. But these rates are not inevitable. There are many actions gay and bisexual men can take to protect themselves and those they care about from HIV. And each of us can take action to help ensure gay and bisexual men know what options are available.

Go to the CDC’s Website to find out what you can do to protect yourself and your community.

New delivery strategy reduces HIV transmission

September 2, 2016

From ASPPH / Washington… 

Researchers delivered ART to reduce the infectiousness of HIV-infected persons and PrEP to reduce susceptibility of their uninfected partners. PrEP was offered prior to ART initiation and for the first six months of ART, until the HIV-infected partner would have been expected to achieve viral suppression. Then PrEP was discontinued.

Jared Baeten

Dr. Jared Baeten

“Our primary goals were to evaluate this delivery model, but partway through the span of the study, it became clear that HIV transmission rates were considerably lower than would have been anticipated,” said lead author Dr. Jared Baeten, vice chair and professor of global health and professor of epidemiology at the School.

Researchers examined the feasibility and acceptability of a program in Kenya and Uganda to offer medications to 1,013 couples in which one member was HIV-positive and the other was HIV-negative. The findings, published online August 23 in PLOS Medicine, showed that the observed rates of HIV transmission were 96 percent lower than simulated rates of transmission in historic controls.

“We learned that the approach is desirable and highly cost-effective and could be delivered affordably to people in that setting,” Dr. Baeten said. Researchers also noted that this study does not include a concurrent comparison population for HIV transmission because it would not have been ethical to enroll a control population and not offer access to PrEP and ART.

Link: http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1002099