Poor kidney function associated with increased cardiovascular risk for people with HIV

Posted August 24, 2016 by administrator
Categories: HIV care, Research

From aidsmap.com

Renal impairment is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in HIV-positive individuals, according to data from a large observational cohort study published in the online edition of the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

KidneysWithin five years of follow-up, over a fifth of people with severely impaired kidney function developed cardiovascular disease compared to less than 2% of individuals with competent kidney function. Even after taking into account age and the side-effects of antiretroviral drugs, severely impaired kidney function remained associated with cardiovascular disease, increasing rates between 30 and 40%.

“In this large heterogeneous cohort of HIV-positive individuals we found a strong association between centrally adjudicated CVD events and advanced levels of renal impairment,” write the authors. “The high rates of CVD observed in older individuals with mild to moderate renal impairment highlight the need for intensified monitoring and search for effective prophylactic measures for impaired renal function and CVD in the ageing HIV-population.”

Read the full article.

HIV/AIDS in 2016

Posted August 22, 2016 by administrator
Categories: Commentary, Features, HIV care, PrEP, Prevention, Research

From The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)…

Overshadowed by the Zika epidemic, concerns about terrorism and security, and the US presidential election, the global HIV/AIDS pandemic persists, with 2.1 million new HIV infections and 1.1 million deaths worldwide in 2015 (http://bit.ly/2ambo2P). The 21st International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa, in July highlighted the remarkable progress since 2000, when the conference was last held in Durban and very few people in Africa received antiretroviral therapy.

patf_mentorAt present, 3.4 million people in South Africa are being treated for HIV infection, more than in any other country in the world; between 2005 and 2015 overall life expectancy at birth in South Africa increased from 53.5 years to 62.5 years (http://bit.ly/1swJbPo). In 2000, 490 000 new HIV infections occurred among children throughout the world; in 2010 the figure decreased to 290 000 and in 2015 to 150 000 (http://bit.ly/2ambo2P). Unlike the $10 000 annual cost of HIV treatment in 2000, the price tag for some first-line antiretroviral regimens now is only $100 per year.

The recent conference aimed to catalyze the work that remains—further scientific advances, addressing stigma, discrimination and other structural barriers within society, and securing the political commitment, including financial resources for prevention, diagnosis and treatment (http://bit.ly/2960ttk). However, fewer people may have been listening than in the past. Among the more than 15 000 participants from 153 countries, including 800 media delegates, few journalists from a US newspaper or television network were on-site in Durban. Although the conference was covered from afar, it was relatively underreported in the United States.

Read the full article.

 

NIH awards $9 million grant for study on health disparities in HIV prevention

Posted August 9, 2016 by administrator
Categories: Features, Prevention

PHILADELPHIA (August 9, 2016) – A research team from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing), the University of Michigan School of Nursing and Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health has been awarded a $9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to adapt and test a HIV prevention intervention for adolescent men who have sex with men. The intervention, referred to as iCON (“I Connect”), builds on an Herb Ritts Foundation initiative and seeks to address the growing disparity in new HIV cases among young men by offering life skills training and community-based HIV prevention resources through an online app.

“Our aim is to empower young gay and bisexual men to find the services they need and enable them to make positive changes in their lives,” said lead researcher José Bauermeister, PhD, MPH, Presidential Associate Professor of Nursing in the Department of Family and Community Health at Penn Nursing. “By empowering change we hope to allow young men to be able to reduce their vulnerability to HIV and to seek the care they need.”

Read the full article.

What long-term HIV survivors should ask their doctors

Posted August 9, 2016 by administrator
Categories: Features, HIV care

From thebody.com

By turning 60, you have achieved something that most people living with HIV never thought possible. I am sure you have developed many skills to remain healthy and optimistic as you age with a disease that has killed millions.

I am right behind you (57 years old and 33-plus years of infection), so I have been actively researching the HIV and aging topic by necessity and as a way to remain in control of my health. I believe that it is our job to remind our busy health care providers about new guidelines for people like us.

Over a quarter of people living with HIV in the United States are now over 50 years of age. Like all aging humans, there are things we need to monitor. Unfortunately, it has been shown that some aging-related conditions occur more frequently in people with HIV, so we need to remain empowered and resilient as we challenge this pesky virus at its own game.

Read the full article.

Study shows equal rates of risky sex between gay and straight male teens — but queer youth still more susceptible to HIV

Posted July 28, 2016 by administrator
Categories: Features, Prevention, Research

From the Advocate.com

As part of the International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention presented a report today analyzing the sexual risk behavior of American males in high school. These risk behaviors included having sex without condoms and having multiple sexual partners. The new study, which compiled data from ninth- through 12th-grade males identifying as gay, bisexual, or heterosexual, found “no significant differences” in the HIV-related risk behaviors between these groups.

Queer youth still getting HIVBut despite the very little difference between the HIV-related risk behaviors of gay youth and that of straight youth, the data show that the rate of HIV transmission is still much higher among men who have sex with men. MSM have an HIV diagnosis rate at 57 times that of heterosexual men. In 2014, for example, MSM represented a full 80 percent of new youth infections.

So why does HIV infection disproportionately affect gay and bisexual men if they don’t engage in risky sexual behavior more often than their heterosexual peers? A huge factor is the increased prevalence of HIV in the sexual networks of gay and bisexual men. And one must also keep in mind that, when it comes to HIV transmission, not all sex acts are created equal. According to Dr. Laura Kann, chief of the CDC’s School-Based Surveillance Branch, MSM are at higher risk because “the transmission risk for receptive anal sex is 17 times higher than [for] vaginal sex.”

Read the full article.

Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force employee offers 25-year retrospective on the HIV/AIDS battle

Posted July 26, 2016 by administrator
Categories: Community, HIV care, PMS Matters

From the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette…  (http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/osd.jsBy David Templeton)

PrEP researchers now focusing on the best ways to get PrEP to people who need it

Posted July 20, 2016 by administrator
Categories: Features, PrEP, Prevention

From aidsmap.com

Speaking to a meeting on pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) yesterday, ahead of the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016), Chris Beyrer, president of the International AIDS Society, reminded delegates that the last time the conference was held in Durban, South Africa, in the year 2000, the event was notable for drawing attention to the enormous gap in access to HIV treatment between rich and poorer countries. That conference began the treatment access era.

Chris Beyrer, president of the International AIDS Society

Chris Beyrer, president of the International AIDS Society

“Now is really the time to start the PrEP access era,” Beyrer said.

The questions about whether PrEP works have been resolved. But a host of questions about the best way to implement PrEP remain, including who to offer PrEP to, where to provide it and how to stimulate demand.

To help health services and countries answer those questions, the World Health Organization (WHO) will soon issue implementation guidance, outlined to the meeting by Rachel Baggaley of WHO and Robert Grant of the University of California. The document is designed to be practical, addressing in separate chapters the needs and interests of political leaders, medicines regulators, community educators, public health officials, clinic administrators, clinicians, counsellors, testing providers, pharmacists, and monitoring and evaluation staff. A specific chapter addressed to individuals taking PrEP will answer their frequently asked questions.

Read the full article.


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