Archive for the ‘PrEP’ category

Find PrEP providers in your area with the PrEP Locator

March 3, 2017

From m4mHealthSex.org

There’s a lot of research now regarding PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) and how taking this daily anti-viral medication can keep you from becoming infected with HIV. The problem is that most gay men don’t want to ask their doctor about it and don’t know how else they can get it.

truvadaBut now you can use a free online tool called PrEP Locator to find PrEP providers near you. The locator is a national directory of providers that you can search by entering your zip code. It’s also accessible on your smart phone as well as your computer.

Note too that in some cases, providers can also help with the cost of PrEP.

PrEP Locator is presented by Emory University, in partnership with M•A•C AIDS Fund.

If you live in the Pittsburgh area, you can also find local resources here.

For more information about PrEP and how it can help protect you from becoming infected with HIV, go to our Website: https://m4mhealthysex.org/what-is-prep/.

 

 

The first large-scale clinical trial of a long-acting injectable drug for HIV prevention begins

December 22, 2016

From NewsMedical.net

injectable-prepThe first large-scale clinical trial of a long-acting injectable drug for HIV prevention began today. The study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, will examine whether a long-acting form of the investigational anti-HIV drug cabotegravir injected once every 8 weeks can safely protect men and transgender women from HIV infection at least as well as the anti-HIV medication Truvada taken daily as an oral tablet. If injectable cabotegravir is found to be effective for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis, also known as PrEP, it may be easier for some people to adhere to than daily oral Truvada, the only licensed PrEP regimen. Truvada consists of the two anti-HIV drugs emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate.

“We urgently need more HIV prevention tools that fit easily into people’s lives,” said Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH. “Although daily oral Truvada clearly works for HIV prevention, taking a daily pill while feeling healthy can be difficult for some people. If proven effective, injectable cabotegravir has the potential to become an acceptable, discreet and convenient alternative for HIV prevention.”

Read the full article.

PATF to offer PrEP as part of new clinic services

December 8, 2016

From the Pittsburgh AIDS Task Force

As part of our new medical services, PATF is excited to now offer Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), a powerful new tool in the fight to halt the spread of HIV! PrEP involves taking a daily medication, called Truvada, and is over 90 percent effective at reducing the risk of HIV transmission for HIV-negative individuals.

logoExpanding access to PrEP is a main component of the national HIV strategy, which has a goal of eliminating new HIV infections. Despite best efforts at HIV prevention, including encouraging condom use, the number of new HIV infections per year in Pittsburgh and the surrounding area has remained stable in the last few years. PrEP empowers individuals with a critical new method to help prevent HIV and is an especially important tool for those who are disproportionately affected by the virus including men who have sex with men and transgender women.

While any medical doctor is able to prescribe PrEP, many are unaware of the regimen or are uncomfortable prescribing it. Furthermore, many individuals may not be comfortable discussing HIV risk factors, like sexual practice or drug use, with primary care physicians. We’re proud to now be part of a small group of clinics and practitioners in Pittsburgh who regularly offer PrEP and who provide a stigma-free zone to discuss HIV risk factors openly and honestly.

PATF’s PrEP for Wellness program takes a holistic approach to sexual health care. Individuals who enroll in the program come into PATF every three months for HIV and STI testing and have a clinical check up every six months. Trained Health Advocates lead clients through the process, answer questions, and help devise strategies to adhere to the medication.

Individuals in our PrEP program are also able to use PATF’s pharmacy, which delivers medications directly to clients at their home or location of their choosing. Though side effects from Truvada are rare and are generally very mild, pharmacy staff is available on-call to answer any questions related to the medication, drug interactions or side effects.

Most insurance covers PrEP, and our pharmacy is specially trained to help with drug assistance programs, including those that cover co-pays and deductibles. Assistance is also available for those without insurance.

For more information on our PrEP for Wellness program, visit www.patf.org or call 412-248-0550.

Why aren’t HIV prevention pills going to the people who need them?

October 26, 2016

From Rolling Stone online

When Truvada was introduced four years ago as a way to prevent HIV, public health leaders didn’t welcome the drug with open arms. The head of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation panned the once-daily pill as a “party drug.” Other health officials claimed that taking Truvada would cause a wave of wild unprotected sex. Even members of the LGBTQ community parroted the criticism, with one gay journalist (regretfully) labeling some users “Truvada whores.”

But the last four years has seen a shift in attitude. More andgetting-prep-to-people-who-need-it more Americans are embracing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), the HIV prevention method that requires a daily dose of Truvada to reduce viral risk. And more and more prescriptions are being written for the antiretroviral drug. While PrEP is growing in popularity, a new study out of the University of California released last month suggests that the populations most at risk of HIV infection are not the ones benefitting from the prevention strategy.

In a survey of gay and bisexual men in California, only a handful of participants reported having taken PrEP. PrEP use was highest among young white men, at 13.9 percent. For young Latino men, that figure was cut by more than half, while young black men represented less than 10 percent of people who started PrEP.

“This is not reflective of the HIV epidemic at all,” says Shannon Weber, founder of Please PrEP Me, an online directory of over 230 clinics in California that provide PrEP. “It is reflective about access, and where and how people are getting that information.”

Read the full article.

New delivery strategy reduces HIV transmission

September 2, 2016

From ASPPH / Washington… 

Researchers delivered ART to reduce the infectiousness of HIV-infected persons and PrEP to reduce susceptibility of their uninfected partners. PrEP was offered prior to ART initiation and for the first six months of ART, until the HIV-infected partner would have been expected to achieve viral suppression. Then PrEP was discontinued.

Jared Baeten

Dr. Jared Baeten

“Our primary goals were to evaluate this delivery model, but partway through the span of the study, it became clear that HIV transmission rates were considerably lower than would have been anticipated,” said lead author Dr. Jared Baeten, vice chair and professor of global health and professor of epidemiology at the School.

Researchers examined the feasibility and acceptability of a program in Kenya and Uganda to offer medications to 1,013 couples in which one member was HIV-positive and the other was HIV-negative. The findings, published online August 23 in PLOS Medicine, showed that the observed rates of HIV transmission were 96 percent lower than simulated rates of transmission in historic controls.

“We learned that the approach is desirable and highly cost-effective and could be delivered affordably to people in that setting,” Dr. Baeten said. Researchers also noted that this study does not include a concurrent comparison population for HIV transmission because it would not have been ethical to enroll a control population and not offer access to PrEP and ART.

Link: http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1002099

Optimal Care Checklist available for men who have sex with men

August 29, 2016

for-men-onlyWhether you are gay, bisexual or any man who has sex with other men (MSM), there are certain health issues that are important for you to talk about with your doctor. This brochure entitled Your Sexual Health, published by the National Coalition of STD Directors and the National Alliance of State & Territorial AIDS Directors, is designed to help you get important health care specific to the wellbeing of gay and bi men.

Issues such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), rising STD rates in the community, getting vaccinated for Hepatitis A & B and for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) are just a few of the topics you might want to discuss with your health care provider. Your Sexual Health can help you break the ice. Being informed is an important first step in protecting yourself and your community.

You can also click on the image to download the checklist brochure.

 

 

HIV/AIDS in 2016

August 22, 2016

From The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)…

Overshadowed by the Zika epidemic, concerns about terrorism and security, and the US presidential election, the global HIV/AIDS pandemic persists, with 2.1 million new HIV infections and 1.1 million deaths worldwide in 2015 (http://bit.ly/2ambo2P). The 21st International AIDS Conference in Durban, South Africa, in July highlighted the remarkable progress since 2000, when the conference was last held in Durban and very few people in Africa received antiretroviral therapy.

patf_mentorAt present, 3.4 million people in South Africa are being treated for HIV infection, more than in any other country in the world; between 2005 and 2015 overall life expectancy at birth in South Africa increased from 53.5 years to 62.5 years (http://bit.ly/1swJbPo). In 2000, 490 000 new HIV infections occurred among children throughout the world; in 2010 the figure decreased to 290 000 and in 2015 to 150 000 (http://bit.ly/2ambo2P). Unlike the $10 000 annual cost of HIV treatment in 2000, the price tag for some first-line antiretroviral regimens now is only $100 per year.

The recent conference aimed to catalyze the work that remains—further scientific advances, addressing stigma, discrimination and other structural barriers within society, and securing the political commitment, including financial resources for prevention, diagnosis and treatment (http://bit.ly/2960ttk). However, fewer people may have been listening than in the past. Among the more than 15 000 participants from 153 countries, including 800 media delegates, few journalists from a US newspaper or television network were on-site in Durban. Although the conference was covered from afar, it was relatively underreported in the United States.

Read the full article.